Geelong Botanic Gardens

Geelong Botanic Gardens

From 1851, when the government of of the new colony of Victoria (Victoria became a separate colony from New South Wales on 1 July 1851) set aside 200 acres of land on the outskirts of Geelong for the purposes of establishing a botanic gardens, the Geelong Botanic Gardens have been developed to be both a place of relaxation and enjoyment for the citizens and a repository of valuable and endangered plants.

The Botanic Gardens cover about 6 hectares (~15 acres). The rest is known as Eastern Park and is a passive and active recreational area. Both the Geelong botanic Gardens and Eastern Park have heritage value, and are listed on the Victorian Heritage Register. About 36 trees in both the gardens and the park are listed on the National Trust Register of Significant Trees.

The Geelong botanic Gardens and Eastern Park are real assets and benefits for the people of Geelong.