Bishop and Clerk, Maria Island, Tasmania, Australia

Bishop and Clerk, Maria Island, Tasmania, Australia
Bishop and Clerk, Maria Island, Tasmania, Australia. The "Bishop and Clerk" peak at the northern end overlooks spectacular cliffs which contain so many fossils that this area was mined for some years in the 1920s for a cement industry on the island. Autumn 2013.

Copyright © Fred Vanderbom

These mountains look a bit like a bishop with his mitre followed by his clerk, hence the name.

Maria Island was named by that tenacious and capable Dutch seaman Abel Tasman, after whom Tasmania is named, in honour of the wife of the then Governor-General of the Dutch East Indies in Batavia.

After being used by sealers, whalers and smugglers for a while, a convict settlement was established on Maria Island in 1825. By 1884 it was closed and the island leased to an Italian businessman Diego Bernacchi, who established vineyards and the Grand Hotel, and later also a cement works. These ventures all eventually failed, and the island became a haven for holidaymakers, which it still is today. It was declared a wildlife reserve in 1971 and a National Park in 1972.

More info on Maria Island can be found at Australian Geographic and Wikipedia