Southern Tasmania and the east coast

Tasmania is a beautiful place, but lags behind the rest of Australia economically, resulting in a contraction of the population, losing more than 20 000 people annually at present. This is due partly to it's isolation - 100 miles of water is a natural barrier - and partly due to an unwillingness to develop.

But it's natural beauty is undeniable, as these pictures from the east and south of Tasmania show. Hobart, the capital, is dominated by Mt Wellington. It is an imposing backdrop to the city, and the views from the top are spectacular. visitors are well catered for. Hobart, the destination port of the Sydney to Hobart ocean race, is defined by mountains and waterways, with great natural beauty around every corner.

The east coast is justifiably a very popular holiday destination. Quiet, peaceful beaches, with clean sand in spectacular locations. Very different from the spectacular wildness of the west coast.

Freycinet Peninsula from Cressy Beach, on the east coast of Tasmania, Australia
Freycinet Peninsula from Cressy Beach, on the east coast of Tasmania, Australia. The afternoon stillness lends a magical quality to the backdrop of the Freycinet Peninsula to the beach and the water of the bay. September 2016.

Copyright © Willem Schultink

Beach walkers Cressy Beach with the Freycinet Peninsula in the background, on the east coast of Tasmania, Australia
Beach walkers Cressy Beach with the Freycinet Peninsula in the background, on the east coast of Tasmania, Australia. Beach walkers enjoying the afternoon stillness at Cressy Beach with the Freycinet Peninsula in the distance. September 2016.

Copyright © Willem Schultink

Redbill Beach, at Bicheno, on the east coast of Tasmania, Australia
Redbill Beach, at Bicheno, on the east coast of Tasmania, Australia. Redbill Beach is a truly beautiful spot. Bicheno is rightly regarded as a prime tourist/ holidaymaker destination on Tasmania's east coat. This is a view of the beach with the town in the background. Just a short distance from the Blowhole. September 2016.

Copyright © Willem Schultink

Blowhole, at Bicheno, on the east coast of Tasmania, Australia
Blowhole, at Bicheno, on the east coast of Tasmania, Australia. The east coast of Tasmania is very different from the west coat. The west coast is exposed to the ocean swell from thousands of miles of ocean, giving scenes of wild weather and spectacular beauty; the east coast is protected from those rugged conditions, giving a more peaceful beauty. As seas break onto these rocks they spout up out of the blowhole you can see to the left of the large rock in the picture. Even on a relatively quiet day like this the spout of water was quite marked. On a rough day with large swells it would be quite spectacular! September 2016.

Copyright © Willem Schultink

Bruny Island, south of Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
Bruny Island, south of Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. The photographer's comment was simple 'No words'. I just say 'Wow!' It's a beautiful spot. 2015

Copyright © Jessica Prins

Bruny Island is separated from mainland Tasmania by the D’Entrecasteaux Channel. Storm Bay, the entrance to the Derwent river, is located to the island's northeast.

Like a bird resting on Abels Bay, southern Tasmania, Australia
Like a bird resting on Abels Bay, southern Tasmania, Australia. A trimaran rests like a bird on the still waters of Abels Bay at the mouth of the Huon River, south of Cygnet in southern Tasmania. September 2016.

Copyright © Willem Schultink

Looking over the Huon river towards the mountains, Abels Bay, southern Tasmania, Australia
Looking over the Huon river towards the mountains, Abels Bay, southern Tasmania, Australia. Abels Bay at the mouth of the Huon River, south of Cygnet in southern Tasmania is a quiet spot with a small community. A small community jetty makes it possible for fishing and sailing and kayaking activities. September 2016.

Copyright © Willem Schultink

Pastel shades in the evening light, Abels Bay, southern Tasmania, Australia
Pastel shades in the evening light, Abels Bay, southern Tasmania, Australia. A peaceful scene in the pastel shades of evening light at Abels Bay, southern Tasmania.. 2016.

Copyright © Helena Prins

The evening sun slots between the clouds to light up Hobart, from Mt Wellington, Tasmania, Australia
The evening sun slots between the clouds to light up Hobart, from Mt Wellington, Tasmania, Australia. Mt Wellington at 1269 metres tall is the dominant feature of the Hobart skyline. The higher reaches are often covered in show, even at times in summer. There is a sealed road to the top, though it is quite narrow in places and care is needed when passing oncoming traffic. It is a very popular place for visitors, and there is extensive parking and an attractive glass enclosed lookout.

Mt Wellington was originally known as 'Table Mountain' a name given by Matthew Flinders in 1791 because it looks a bit like Table Mountain at Table Bay in Cape Town, South Africa. It was renamed 'Mt Wellington' in 1832 in honour of the Duke of Wellington who finally defeated Napoleon in 1815.

In this pic the sunlight slots between the clouds and lights up the city of Hobart, with the iconic Tasman Bridge on the left of the picture. September 2016.

Copyright © Willem Schultink

Bruny Island and the d'Entrecasteaux Channel, from Mt Wellington, Tasmania, Australia
Bruny Island and the d'Entrecasteaux Channel, from Mt Wellington, Tasmania, Australia. Bruny Island and the d'Entrecasteaux Channel were named by the French explorer and navigator Bruni d'Entrecasteaux in 1792. He was the first European to sail up the river and map it.

You can see Bruny Island in the distance, and South Bruny Island in the far distance. They are joined by a narrow isthmus of land known as 'the Neck'. September 2016.

Copyright © Willem Schultink

Enclosed glass lookout on the summit of Mt Wellington, Tasmania, Australia
Enclosed glass lookout on the summit of Mt Wellington, Tasmania, Australia. The enclosed glass lookout at the top of Mt Wellington is much appreciated by visitors, especially on cold days! It gives spectacular views of Hobart and the surrounding areas. There is also a significant number of boardwalks - thoughtfully covered with anti-slip netting! - around the peak so visitors can go to different points to get different views. September 2016.

Copyright © Willem Schultink

Australia's Antarctic supply ship, the 'Aurora Australis. and the French polar research vessel ''L'Astrolabe', in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
Australia's Antarctic supply ship, the Aurora Australis. and the French polar research vessel and icebreaker L'Astrolabe in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. The Aurora Australis replaced the Nella Dan in 1990. (The Nella Dan was wrecked at Macquarie Island in 1987.) She is 94 metres long and displaces just over 8000 tonnes. She is capable of breaking ice of up to 1.2 metres thick at a speed of 2.5 knots. Owned by P&O she is usually chartered by the Australian Antarctic Division during the summer, but winters in Hobart. She has also been chartered by the Australian Navy. She has a hangar and helideck for three helicopters. September 2016.

Copyright © Willem Schultink

The Richmond Bridge, Australia's oldest operating bridge, at Richmond, near Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
The Richmond Bridge, Australia's oldest operating bridge, at Richmond, near Hobart, Tasmania, Australia The Richmond Bridge is the oldest still working bridge in Australia, and the oldest stone arch bridge in Australia. Construction was started in 1823, when the foundation stone was laid, and finished in 1825. The bridge was built using convict labour. In 1832, George Grover, a deeply unpopular local gaoler because of his ferocity in flogging prisoners, was murdered by being pushed off the bridge. In 1885 the three middle piers had the larger cutwaters added, while the two outer piers did not. September 2016.

Copyright © Jessica Prins