Sights from Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Sydney. A big, bustling city. Recognisable instantly through its harbour bridge and opera house. But there is more to Sydney than those two landmarks. These pics show a different side to Sydney. The bold and the beautiful, but also a glimpse at the dark and the sorrowful.

Aussie Stories - telling about Australia in words and pictures
Koole Imaging is based in Queensland, in the harbour city of Gladstone. He says, among other things

'...Australia is an amazing diverse country too beautiful not to share with the world! ... '

ThisisAustralia.com.au has permission to share them on our pages too. We do so with appreciation.

All Koole Imaging photos are Copyright © Koole Imaging.
Aussie Stories - telling about Australia in words and pictures

Sydney Tower, Sydney, NSW, Australia
Sydney Tower, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Sydney Tower is Sydney's tallest free-standing structure, and the second tallest in Australia. The Q1 building on the Gold Coast is the tallest. It is also the second tallest observation tower in the Southern Hemisphere. Auckland's Sky Tower is taller, though Sydney Tower Eye's main observation deck is almost 50 metres higher than Auckland Sky Tower's observation deck. The Tower's plans were unveiled in 1968 and construction of the tower itself was begun in 1975. It was opened to the public in 1981.

Copyright © Koole Imaging

More info on the Sydney tower from Wikipedia

Helios Fountain, Hyde Park, Sydney, NSW, Australia
The Archibald, or Helios Fountain, Hyde Park, Sydney, NSW, Australia. This was the gift of JF Archibald, who was the editor of The Bulletin, and was inaugurated in 1932, thirteen years after he died. It was designed by the French sculptor François-Léon Sicard, and features the Greek figure of Apollo with a fountain. An interesting and different take in this monochrome image.

Copyright © Koole Imaging

Further info on the Archibald Fountain can be found at Dictionary of Sydney

A busker at Circular Quay, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
A busker at Circular Quay, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Another of the interesting things you see in Sydney.

Copyright © Koole Imaging

A busker in Hyde Park, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
A busker in Hyde Park, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Buskers come in all shapes, sizes, ages and cultures. Makes for interesting city living!

Copyright © Koole Imaging

Also on the streets of Sydney - a street beggar. Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Also on the streets of Sydney - a street beggar. Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Not all aspects of a bustling city life are positive. For some it grinds them into the dust.

Copyright © Koole Imaging

Homeless man in Hyde Park. Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Homeless man in Hyde Park. Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. For some it is harder.

When visiting Sydney a couple of years ago, I noticed that at the end of footbridges on the Domain there were recesses in the wall of the bridge which had a supply of blankets and quilts wrapped in plastic. In Sydney, even if you are homeless, at least you can be warm! I thought that it was a thoughtful touch on the part of whoever was responsible for organising and maintaining that.

Copyright © Koole Imaging

Feeding the pigeons in Hyde Park, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Feeding the pigeons in Hyde Park, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Wherever you go there are pigeons, wanting to be fed. The pigeons are smart enough to know where to be to get a feed!

Copyright © Koole Imaging

Circular Quay railway station, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Circular Quay railway station, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Copyright © Koole Imaging

Pedestrian tunnel, St Francis railway station, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Pedestrian tunnel, St Francis railway station, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Copyright © Koole Imaging

Subway tunnel, St Francis railway station, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Subway tunnel, St Francis railway station, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Copyright © Koole Imaging

Clock tower, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Clock tower, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Copyright © Koole Imaging

Corner building, CBD, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Corner building, CBD, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Copyright © Koole Imaging

Floating Restaurant, Darling Harbour, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Floating Restaurant, Darling Harbour, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The SS South Steyne is a 70 metre long steamship making it the world's largest operational steam ferry.

Built in Leith, Scotland for the Port Jackson and Manly Steamship Company, the South Steyne was launched on April 1st, 1938 and on July 7th 1938, it steamed the 22,000 kilometres to Australia arriving on September 19th the same year.

It is the most famous of the Manly ferries. It crossed between Circular Quay and Manly over 100,000 times over its 36 years, carrying well in excess of 92 million passengers.

Copyright © Koole Imaging

Info sourced from South Steyne

Glass blower, The Rocks, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Glass blower, The Rocks, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Copyright © Koole Imaging

Old new buildings, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
The new and the old, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The clock tower in the foreground was once the tallest building in Sydney.

Copyright © Koole Imaging

Pathway to enlightenment, St Philip's Anglican Church, York Street, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Pathway to enlightenment, St Philip's Anglican Church, York Street, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. August 2011.

St Philip's is the oldest Parish in Australia, together with the Parish of Parramatta. In January 1788 eleven ships carrying around 1400 people, including 786 convicts, arrived from England on the east coast of Australia to establish a penal colony. The Chaplain of the First Fleet was the Rev Richard Johnson and he conducted the first Christian service in Australia on 3 February 1788.

The wattle and daub church built by Johnson in 1793 was burnt down in 1798. A new stone church, named St Philip’s, was opened in 1810, and this was replaced by the current building in 1856.

More info on St Philip's

This photo Copyright © Rodney Campbell.