Silverton, outback NSW

Silverton, outback NSW

Silverton is an historic town about 25 km northwest of Broken Hill. Originally established as a mining town it had a population of about 3000 up to about 1880, when people started to leave to the much richer mines of Broken Hill. Now it has a population of about 50.

There are many attractions around Silverton. The old gaol, the pub, the Mad Max museum. The Mad Max museum is a concentration of macho! Many films have been made around Silverton, because of its historic nature and its outback location. The Umberumberka Reservoir is a few kilometres out of town.

Brumbies along the road to Silverton, New South Wales Australia
Brumbies along the road to Silverton, New South Wales Australia. Silverton is set on Silverton Common, a Crown Reserve of about 12 000 acres (4856 hectares). The common has existed for about 125 years, and is administered by the NSW government. Stock can roam on the Common, and in the pic above you can see a couple of brumbies (wild horses), who seem to be doing pretty well. The whole area is semi-arid land.

The Silverton Common is part of an Unincorporated Area of NSW, which is not part of a local council. This Area covers about 93 000 square kilometres and surrounds but does not include Broken Hill. June 2016.

More info on Silverton can be found here.

Copyright © Willem Schultink

Dry river bed shows the effects of torrents of water during flash flooding, Silverton, New South Wales Australia
Dry river bed shows the effects of torrents of water during flash flooding, Silverton, New South Wales Australia. The road from Broken Hill to Silverton is very rough for a sealed road. (It makes the Sunraysia Highway in Victoria feel smooth, which is an achievement!). There are many dips, or floodways - 39 floodways in the 25 kilometres. This pic show a dry river bed near Silverton, and also shows why the floodways are necessary. When the rains come flash flooding can be intense. The floodways are necessary to let the water flow. June 2016.

Copyright © Willem Schultink

Water tank alongside a dry river bed, Silverton, New South Wales Australia
Water tank alongside a dry river bed, Silverton, New South Wales Australia. Alongside the dry river bed were several houses. The water tanks are their only reliable water supply. Just over the river is a large caravan park. Has all the facilities, but looks a bit run down, June 2016.

Copyright © Willem Schultink

Umberumberka Reservoir, Silverton, New South Wales Australia
Umberumberka Reservoir, Silverton, New South Wales Australia. The Umberumberka Reservoir was completed in 1915, more than 100 years ago, after being commenced in 1911. Before that broken Hill was supplied by the Stephens Creek Reservoir, but this was only a small reservoir which was rapidly becoming inadequate. It was a pretty labour intensive project with about 500 men employed on construction. About 50 000 200 kg drums of concrete were brought to Silverton by train and the last several kilometres by horse and cart. The landscape is quite rugged, and in the early 1900s must have posed some pretty big challenges for the construction crew. But just as CY O'Connor and his crew built the Perth to Kalgoorlie pipeline in 1897-1902, so George Mullen and his crew overcame the obstacles and succeeded.

There is a memorial to George Sidney Mullen, the supervising construction engineer, at the road end of the wall. June 2016.

Copyright © Willem Schultink

Umberumberka Reservoir is almost dry, Silverton, New South Wales Australia
Umberumberka Reservoir is almost dry, Silverton, New South Wales Australia. The Umberumberka Reservoir is almost dry. It was built in 1915, more than 100 years ago, and you can see the silting that has occurred. There has been quite some rain in the last few weeks in the Broken Hill region. In November 2010 the reservoir was full to overflowing, so conditions can bring about big changes in a relatively short time. June 2016.

Copyright © Willem Schultink

Road over the Mundi Mundi Plains, toward Silverton, New South Wales Australia
Road over the Mundi Mundi Plains, toward Silverton, New South Wales Australia. The road from Umberumberka Reservoir to Silverton snakes away over the Mundi Mundi plains. From the lookout near the reservoir. You can see the barrenness and the isolation of the area. June 2016.

Copyright © Willem Schultink

Mad Max Museum, Silverton, New South Wales Australia
Mad Max 2 Museum, Silverton, New South Wales Australia. The Mad Max 2 museum at Silverton is a bastion of macho! Mad Max was one of a number of movies filmed in the Silverton town and surrounding areas. The museum is a vast collection of movie props and equipment. I'm not a movie buff, but I quite enjoyed looking through the collection. They had interesting solutions to the problems encountered in making movies. You realise very quickly that it's all show and very little substance. June 2016.

Copyright © Willem Schultink

Force 10 Charger at the Mad Max 2 Museum, Silverton, New South Wales Australia
Force 10 Charger at the Mad Max 2 Museum, Silverton, New South Wales Australia. The engine air scoops and the grille of the charger are just paper mache, cardboard and plastic. There is a Ford Interceptor in the background. June 2016.

Copyright © Willem Schultink

Ruins of an old building between the Mad Max 2 Museum and a cafe, Silverton, New South Wales Australia
Ruins of an old building between the Mad Max 2 Museum and a cafe, Silverton, New South Wales Australia. Between the Mad Max 2 museum and a cafe is the ruins of an old building with interesting paraphernalia in the yard. On the verandah was the biggest engineers vice I have seen. June 2016.

Copyright © Willem Schultink